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The Mythomaniacs by Jules Bass

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The Lost Princess of Oz - Fully Illustrated

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by Jeanne White Eagle

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The Mythomaniacs
by Jules Bass
When a simple trick goes wrong, 15 year-old Gilbert, amateur magician & illustrator of his father's fairy tales, accidentally transforms a group of readers into characters from his books (and himself into the spitting image of the magician Merlin). Struggling to find a way to bring everyone-including himself-back to normal, he embarks upon a wild odyssey through the world of his own fairy tales.

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The Mystic Travelogues (Volume 1)
by J.C. Nusbaum
Ten-year-old Tug is lost in the world, even to himself. Shuffled from one relative to the next, he has no place to call home and no sense of what his future will hold. But when destiny intervenes and sends Tug and his cousin Jodie to stay with a distant uncle in Vermont, they could not anticipate the strange occurrences at the enchanted old house. When their uncle disappears under mysterious circumstances, the two children begin a journey that will challenge their courage and reveal magic both underneath them and inside of them.

Travel to a mystic destination—
where animals know your destiny,
where dangerous Nomes lurk in the shadows,
and where a stuffed bear can bring you to life.

Visit the Mystic Travelogues Website

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Mystical Numerology: The Creative Power of Sounds and Numbers
by John B. Pehrson
Mystical Numerology is a practical introduction to a new science of numbers which opens up new vistas and avenues of self-exploration and growth for both the beginner and the seasoned numerologist. In its integration of ancient wisdom traditions from many cultures with both number symbolism and sound, Mystical Numerology is unique in the field of numerology and goes far beyond the usual books to offer insights that resonate with the soul. Reflecting thousands of hours of research and application of the theory to the lives of real people, Pehrson's pioneering tour de force offers a valuable way for us to access the power of numbers to help guide us through this transitional time. In its articulation of a new 13-month calendar, it can help shift global culture into a new, more viable paradigm.

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Grace: A Journey from Betrayal to Healing
by Jeanne White Eagle
Jeanne White Eagle’s book, Grace, is an exploration of the questions, “How is the horror of betrayal from those one has so deeply trusted, even possible? And how then, do relationships (friends, relatives, countries) so split apart, heal?”

These questions are awakened on a trip Jeanne and her husband John Pehrson take to Bosnia in 2007. She encounters the victims of the war and their stories first hand.

Not long after her time in Bosnia, haunted by questions brought on by what she had seen and heard, Jeanne herself goes through an encounter of personal betrayal of devastating proportions. In her journey to heal she wrestles with confusion, suppressed emotions of anger and feelings of depression, including the constant struggle of self examination. She soon comes to realize that her own experience carries the answers she has been searching for to the questions born in Bosnia.

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The Missing Boatman
by Keith C. Blackmore
Miracles are happening.  Pray to God they stop.

Visit Keith C. Blackmore's website

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How to Survive and Thrive in the Coming Earth Changes
by Susan Mehrtens, Ph.D.
"In How to Survive and Thrive in the Coming Earth Changes, Mehrtens has given us a valuable road map through the changes that are now upon us. No matter where you are on the spiritual path, this brilliant collection of essays will offer you something valuable."
- John Pehrson, author of Journey for the One

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C.G. Jung and Our Collective Future
by Susan Mehrtens, Ph.D.
The Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung is well known as the father of analytical psychology, the developer of the concept of the archetype, and the genius who understood the relevance of alchemy to psychology. Less well known is that Jung was also the coiner of the phrase “New Age,” and a pioneer in preparing for what he called the “Age of Aquarius.”

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Jung the Man: His Life Examined
by Susan Mehrtens, Ph.D.
Many people know Carl Jung as the father of analytical psychology and the developer of the concept of the archetype. Less well-known is that Jung coined the phrase “New Age” and pioneered in preparing people for what he called the “Age of Aquarius.” But how many people really know Jung the man, the human being, husband, father and friend? The human side of Jung has often been forgotten in the focus we put on his ideas, concepts and psychology.

This succinct biography presents a vivid picture of Jung via:
~ a short synopsis of life
~ a portrait of the man through his likes and dislikes, hobbies and interests
~ an assessment of his type and personality
~ an analysis of his shadow side and his complexes
~ an image of Jung at home, as husband and father
~ Jung, the “ladies’ man,” surrounded by his “Valkyries”

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Forgotten Fairytales Volume 2: Legends of Number Nip
From the Editor's Preface:
Number Nip may be a name unfamiliar to most, but his character originates from pagan times and has been the subject of countless legends and fairytales. Often called Rübezahl in German folklore, he was first mentioned in print in a 1565 poem by Franz von Koeckritz titled Ribicinia. Stories about Rübezahl were written down throughout the 17th Century, and in the 18th Century, Musäus collected five of these tales in his Legenden vom Rübezahl. It is from Musäus’ work that Mark Lemon adapted this collection of “legends,” giving the German Gnome the moniker Number Nip.

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Forgotten Fairytales Volume 1: Chronicles of the Three Sisters
Chronicles of the Three Sisters is a tale unfamiliar to most readers today. It is, however, in good company with other classic fairytales such as Cinderella, Repunzel, Snow White and Sleeping Beauty. These stories were published together in The Pentamero by Giambattista Basile in 1636. Though Basile recorded and produced the earliest known publication of The Three Sisters (then titled The Three Animal Kings), it has been around for generations prior to Basile, handed down orally in ancient places like Crete and Venice. The story was continuously adapted by the likes of Musäus, Perrault, the Brothers Grimm and, eventually, this version penned by Mark Lemon and illustrated by Charles H. Bennett in 1868.

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Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens & Peter and Wendy
This ebook contains two of J. M. Barrie's books: Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, and Peter and Wendy. All of the original illustrations are included. There are 74 illustrations in Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, most of them in full color, by illustrator Arthur Rackham, who also illustrated Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. There are 13 illustrations in Peter and Wendy, by illustrator F. D. Bedford.

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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
The book that started it all. If you've never had the pleasure of reading the original version (silver slippers?!) of the story as Baum and Denslow intended, this is the best (perhaps the only) digital version with all the illustrations included.


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The Marvelous Land of Oz
Book #2 in Baum's Oz series. Includes all the original illustrations by John R. Neil, including several color plates, and a new Preface by Oz expert and Eltanin Editor Joseph Nusbaum.


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Ozma of Oz
Book #3 in Baum's Oz series. Dorothy is back in the land of Oz, and meets new friends (Tiktok, Billina, the Queen of Ev) and catches up with old friends. Over 100 images, more than half of which are in color.


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Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz
Book #4 in Baum's Oz series. It took eight years for the Wonderful Wizard to make his way back to Oz in 1908. The return was all but inevitable. In Baum’s introduction to Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz, he is clearly resigned to delivering what thousands of children had been clamoring for: “Oz — Oz! More about Oz, Mr. Baum!”


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The Road to Oz
Book #5 in Baum's Oz series. If Baum’s prior book, Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz, struck too dark and grim a tone with many Oz fans, The Road to Oz brings readers back to a marvelous fairyland where the greatest hardship our heroes may endure is perhaps a little mischief.


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The Emerald City Oz
Baum pulled out all the stops for his 6th and, what he believed was to be the final, Oz book. He elevates this Oz book beyond the constructs of a direct and simple narrative; for the first time, he constructs two parallel storylines that follow the protagonists (Dorothy, the Wizard and others) as well as the Nome King and his brood of antagonists on two separate journeys where both parties encounter a range of mystifying populations.


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The Patchwork Girl of Oz
There’s something liberating about second chances, and L. Frank Baum took full advantage of his when he wrote The Patchwork Girl of Oz. Having intended to end the Oz series forever in his prior book, The Emerald City of Oz, Baum “discovered” a way to resume communications with Oz and continue the series.


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Tik-Tok of Oz
Tik-Tok of Oz follows a band of characters as they attempt to find and rescue The Shaggy Man's brother from the Nome King. Some we have met before, such as The Shaggy Man, the Nome King, Polychrome, Tik-Tok, and even a brief appearance by Toto (who has a surprise for everyone).


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The Scarecrow of Oz
Trot (who first appeared in Baum's 1911 book The Sea Fairies) is a young girl from California who finds herself transported to a magical fairlyland in this book. Though she is unaware of her famous environs, when she meets the Scarecrow she states, “I think I’ve heard of you… you used to live in the Land of Oz.”


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Rinkitink in Oz
Baum had initially written an unpublished fairy tale in 1905 entitled King Rinkitink. The manuscript was tucked away for over a decade until Baum decided in 1916 to repurpose it for one of his annual Oz books, redrafting the ending to bring in characters from the other Oz books to close the story.


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The Lost Princess of Oz
When Baum began drafting The Lost Princess of Oz, he was driven by inspiration that took his writings about Oz in a new direction. Baum credits one of his young readers with the germ that grew into Lost Princess: "I s'pose if Ozma ever got lost, or stolen, ev'rybody in Oz would be dreadful sorry." With this notion, Baum began to imagine the resulting upheaval and collective search for the fairyland's beloved ruler.


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